Even more Book Reviews

IMG_0060I’m doing more reading than blog writing this month – so here are a few more for your list:

 

Next LIfe Might Be Kinder by Norman Howard

I really liked this book. You know from the start there has been a murder. Told from Sam Lattimore, the husband’s, point of view, we feel his grief and troubled adjustment to the terrible murder of Elizabeth. We even know who murdered her. But we don’t know why, and that is the story that slowly unfolds, through the perspective of the traumatized spouse. A great love story, great character development, and a mystery as well. Rate: 4.5 stars

The Twelve Rooms of the Nile by Enid Shomer

A fascinating piece of historical ficiton, Shomer tells the story of two well known people – Florence Nightingale and Gustave Flaubert (Madam Bovary) who actually did take trips up and down the Nile in 1850. The fiction comes in by having the two meet and become friends. Shomer’s descriptions are superb, to the point that I had to keep running to my laptop to look up the sites the travelers visited. This book definitely made me want to do a Nile River cruise. I was also jealous of these travelers – six months for a trip? That would be wonderful. The story line is simple, but perfect and the character development wonderful. Rate 4.5 stars

Another Man’s Moccasins by Craig Johnson

Another one of the Walt Longmire series. So, these are traditional series/ genre, but for me they stand out. I have loved reading this series, and I think it’s because Johnson is consistent in character development, yet adds a very new story to each of the series. Sure, they are all about Longmire solving a crime, but this one adds flashbacks to his time in Vietnam, which tie neatly into the current crime. 4.5 stars for the Longmire series. (I have been on the waiting list for the TV series DVD, and was finally noticed by the library last night, I’ll let you know what I think)

A Widow for a Year by John Irving

It has been a long time since I read a John Irving book, although he is definitely one of my favorite authors. In fact, The World According to Garp, is one of my favorite books. This book is great as well. I don’t know what it is about his writing, he weaves here and there, humor, sorrow, different point of view from a wide variety of characters, these all combine to give me the sense I am in the story, I know these people, this could happen to me. This is the story about writers and readers, with the main character suffering great loss. Ruth Cole is four years old when her mother disappears – no foul play, just leaves. Comforted by Eddie, her mother’s sixteen year old lover, and raised by her ever-womanizing father, Ruth’s stories are her therapy. Add Eddie’s novels, his therapy, and Marion (the missing mother) writing under a pseudonym, and the complications arise right and left. Rate – 4.0 starts

Movies: I am going to follow in Marlene’s footsteps and let you know what I have been watching, which is rare for me! But I was off at the cabin writing and needed some distraction (no internet, wow):

Far From the Madding Crowd

This film is based on a book written in 1874. It is a triangle, or even quadrangle of a love story. The beautiful Bathsheba wittingly and unwittingly traps herself with three different men, and one can only hope that true love will prevail. She is at times such a frustrating character, I for one, hoped that Gabriel Oak, the good guy, would quit loving her and find someone nicer. Anyway, a PBS film, it was great. Rate 3.5 stars

Birdsong:

A love and war story, not unlike many others, this one is kind of a tear jerker. Stephen Wraysford is thwarted in love by an unpredictable woman (who just happens to be married!) Enter all the usual problems – war, separation, obligations – but these are well done and emotional. Rate: 3.5 stars

Comments

  1. Thanks for the recommends but gads…..there are just too many books to read! I have a stack here from my Sister-in-law plus another Zip. So your list is printed for the future! I appreciate your time in putting these up. I also liked Irving’s book. In fact I haven’t read one of his that I didn’t like. Of course, I am looking forward to a review I can print about the new book. Cheering for you!

Speak Your Mind